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In   the   years   after   his   death,   Father   John   Ogilvie   was   revered   as   a   martyr   throughout   Europe,   wherever   his   story was   told.   The   Scripture   scholar   Cornelius   a   Lapide,   whohad   known   Ogilvie   at   Jesuit   College,   wrote:   "It   is   clear from   the   account   of   his   martyrdom   that   he   astonished   the   Calvinists,   for   although   unconquered   by   torture   and   still bold and ready in debate, he opened not his mouth against his tormentors." In   a   testimony   in   1629   to   Catholic   Church   authorities   who   were   considering   whether   John   Ogilvie   had   died   a martyr,   William   Sinclair,   an   Edinburgh   lawyer   who   had   been   banished,   wrote   of   what   he   had   heard   from   fellow prisoners   and   others   who   had   witnessed   the   execution:   “I   know   for   certain   that   he   persevered   in   his   Catholic   faith up   to   the   last   moment   of   his   life,   in   a   devout,   pious   and   steadfast   manner.   On   the   night   before   his   death,   he   devoted all   the   time   that   he   possibly   could   to   prayer   and   spiritual   meditation,   and   they   further   add   that   he   did   the   same before   ascending   the   steps   themselves,   calling   both   God   and   his   fellow   men   to   witness   that   he   died   in   the   Roman Catholic   faith.   His   piety   and   also   his   constancy   were   proved   by   his   readiness   to   forgive   all   those   who   had   trespassed against   him   just   as   he   prayed   God   to   forgive   him,   and   by   embracing   and   kissing   the   scaffold   and   finally   bidding   the hangman to be of good heart and by pardoning him also. It is impossible that he did not die as a martyr..........” Following   the   Reformation,   the   Catholic   Church   had   almost   died   out   –   but   it stayed   alive   in   corners   of   Scotland,   not   least   in   parts   of   the   North-East   and especially   in   John   Ogilvie’s   homeland   of   Banffshire.   At   Scalan,   in   Glenlivet,   a seminary    operated    from    1716-32,    producing    priests    who    headed    out    to    all parts   of   the   country   to   minister   in   secret.   These   brave   men   were   following   in the   footsteps   of   the   likes   of   Ogilvie.   Scalan   had   been   attacked   and   burned   by government   troops,   but   the   staff   and   students   returned   from   hiding   to   rebuild and   prepare   to   set   out   to   keep   our   faith   alive.   In   the   latter   half   of   the   1700s, the   Penal   Laws   were   relaxed   and   in   1793   they   were   largely   abolished,   allowing Catholics once again to practise their religion openly and free of fear.
St. John Ogilvie
Path to Sainthood - Part One
Image of St. John Ogilvie from a 1915 book.
Address: Chapel Street Keith Moray AB55 5AL SCOTLAND    Dean: Fr Colin Stewart (01343) 542280     or   (01807) 580795 Priests in residence in Huntly: Fr Kingsley Chigbo CCE (01466) 410200 Fr Peter Ezekoka e-mail: chapelstthomas@yahoo.co.uk A parish of the R.C. Diocese of Aberdeen Charitable Trust, Registered Charity Number SC 005122
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church
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  St John Ogilvie
Path to Sainthood       Part One
In   the   years   after   his   death,   Father   John   Ogilvie   was   revered as   a   martyr   throughout   Europe,   wherever   his   storywas   told. The    Scripture    scholar    Cornelius    a    Lapide,    whohad    known Ogilvie   at   Jesuit   College,   wrote:   "It   is   clearfrom   the   account   of his   martyrdom   that   he   astonished   the   Calvinists,   for   although unconquered   by   torture   and   still   bold   and   ready   in   debate,   he opened not his mouth against his tormentors." In   a   testimony   in   1629   to   Catholic   Church   authorities   who were   considering   whether   John   Ogilvie   had   died   a   martyr, William     Sinclair,     an     Edinburgh     lawyer     who     had     been banished,   wrote   of   what   he   had   heard   from   fellow   prisoners and    others    who    had    witnessed    the    execution:    “I    know    for certain   that   he   persevered   in   his   Catholic   faith   up   to   the   last moment   of   his   life,   in   a   devout,   pious   and   steadfast   manner.   On the    night    before    his    death,    he    devoted    all    the    time    that    he possibly    could    to    prayer    and    spiritual    meditation,    and    they further   add   that   he   did   the   same   before   ascending   the   steps themselves,   calling   both   God   and   his   fellow   men   to   witness   that he    died    in    the    Roman    Catholic    faith.    His    piety    and    also    his constancy   were   proved   by   his   readiness   to   forgive   all   those   who had   trespassed   against   him   just   as   he   prayed   God   to   forgive   him, and   by   embracing   and   kissing   the   scaffold   and   finally   bidding the   hangman   to   be   of   good   heart   and   by   pardoning   him   also.   It is impossible that he did not die as a martyr..........” Following   the   Reformation,   the   Catholic   Church   had   almost died   out   –   but   it   stayed   alive   in   corners   of   Scotland,   not   least in    parts    of    the    North-east    and    especially    in    John    Ogilvie’s homeland   of   Banffshire.   At   Scalan,   in   Glenlivet,   a   seminary operated   from   1716-32,   producing   priests   who   headed   out   to all   parts   of   the   country   to   minister   in   secret.   These   brave men   were   following   in   the   footsteps   of   the   likes   of   Ogilvie. Scalan   had   been   attacked   and   burned   by   government   troops, but   the   staff   and   students   returned   from   hiding   to   rebuild and   prepare   to   set   out   to   keep   our   faith   alive.   In   the   latter half   of   the   1700s,   the   Penal   Laws   were   relaxed   and   in   1793 they   were   largely   abolished,   allowing   Catholics   once   again   to practise their religion openly and free of fear.
Image of St. John Ogilvie from a 1915 book.
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church