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For    five    months    after    his    arrest,    Father    John    was    subjected    to    starvation,    beatings,    torture    and    sleep deprivation   –   but   he   met   it   all   with   equanimity,   humour   and   courage.   He   even   engaged   in   religious   arguments with ministers. He   was   moved   to   Edinburgh   in   early   December   for   further   investigation   by   the   Privy   Council   of   the   King,   which consisted   of   the   Archbishop   of   Glasgow,   Lord   Binning,   Sir   Gideon   Murray,   Lord   Kilsyth   and   Sir   William   Oliphant. After   a   day’s   trial,   Father   John   was   ordered   to   be   subjected   to   the   torture   of   the   Vigil   or   Waking,   which   had   been designed   to   ensure   confessions   of   witchcraft.      The   prisoner   was   kept   awake   by   being   punched,   thrown   to   the stone   floor,   and   being   pierced   by   sharp   instruments   or   "witch’s   bridles".   This   went   on   for   eight   days   and   nine nights, from the 12 th  to the 21 st  of December, until a doctor pronounced that he was within hours of death. Through   all   this,   he   had   refused   to   disclose   the   names   of   Catholics   to   whom   he   had   been   ministering.      After   a few hours’ rest, he was brought back in front of the judges, still resisting threats and promises to save his skin. On   the   24 th    of   December   he   was   taken   by   horseback   to   Glasgow,   where   for   weeks   he   was   shackled   to   a   heavy iron,   unable   to   sit   up   without   help.      In   a   letter   smuggled   out   of   prison,   he   wrote :   "I   lie   burdened   with   an   iron weight   of   200lb,   awaiting   death   unless   I   accept   what   is   offered   with   the   King’s   clemency;   that   is,   a   rich   provostry   and abjure   the   faith.   Having   been   tortured   once   by   a   vigil   of   nine   nights   and   eight   days,   I   now   await   a   second   torture   and afterwards death. The gaoler will be coming back." Banishment   for   saying   Mass,   like   others,   was   no   longer   an   option.   The   Ogilvie   case   had   now   gone   further,   and the   King   wanted   him   to   repudiate   the   Pope   or   die.      On   the   18 th    of   January,   1615,   King   James   intervened   directly to   draft   a   list   of   five   questions,   all   designed   to   force   the   priest   into   accepting,   or   rejecting,   the   "divine   right"   of the King in all matters, spiritual and temporal, which he sent to Spottiswoode..
St. John Ogilvie
Torture
Address: Chapel Street Keith Moray AB55 5AL SCOTLAND Priests in residence  in Huntly Parish Administrator:  Fr Kingsley Chigbo CCE (01466) 410200 & Fr Peter Ezekoka e-mail: chapelstthomas@yahoo.co.uk A parish of the R.C. Diocese of Aberdeen Charitable Trust, Registered Charity Number SC 005122
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church
St Thomas' Keith adheres to the Privacy Policies as set by the RC Diocese of Aberdeen.
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St John Ogilvie
Torture
For   five   months   after   his   arrest,   Father   John   was   subjected   to starvation,   beatings,   torture   and   sleep   deprivation   –   but   he met   it   all   with   equanimity,   humour   and   courage.   He   even engaged in religious arguments with ministers. He   was   moved   to   Edinburgh   in   early   December   for   further investigation   by   the   Privy   Council   of   the   King,   which   consisted of    the    Archbishop    of    Glasgow,    Lord    Binning,    Sir    Gideon Murray,   Lord   Kilsyth   and   Sir   William   Oliphant.   After   a   day’s trial,   Father   John   was   ordered   to   be   subjected   to   the   torture of   the   Vigil   or   Waking,   which   had   been   designed   to   ensure confessions   of   witchcraft.      The   prisoner   was   kept   awake   by being   punched,   thrown   to   the   stone   floor,   and   being   pierced by   sharp   instruments   or   "witch’s   bridles".   This   went   on   for eight    days    and    nine    nights,    from    the    12 th     to    the    21 st     of December,    until    a    doctor    pronounced    that    he    was    within hours of death. Through   all   this,   he   had   refused   to   disclose   the   names   of Catholics    to    whom    he    had    been    ministering.        After    a    few hours’   rest,   he   was   brought   back   in   front   of   the   judges,   still resisting threats and promises to save his skin. On    the    24 th     of    December    he    was    taken    by    horseback    to Glasgow,   where   for   weeks   he   was   shackled   to   a   heavy   iron, unable   to   sit   up   without   help.      In   a   letter   smuggled   out   of prison,   he   wrote :   "I   lie   burdened   with   an   iron   weight   of   200lb, awaiting   death   unless   I   accept   what   is   offered   with   the   King’s clemency;   that   is,   a   rich   provostry   and   abjure   the   faith.   Having been   tortured   once   by   a   vigil   of   nine   nights   and   eight   days,   I   now await   a   second   torture   and   afterwards   death.   The   gaoler   will   be coming back." Banishment   for   saying   Mass,   like   others,   was   no   longer   an option.   The   Ogilvie   case   had   now   gone   further,   and   the   King wanted   him   to   repudiate   the   Pope   or   die.      On   the   18 th    of January,   1615,   King   James   intervened   directly   to   draft   a   list   of five   questions,   all   designed   to   force   the   priest   into   accepting, or    rejecting,    the    "divine    right"    of    the    King    in    all    matters, spiritual and temporal, which he sent to Spottiswoode..
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church