© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem 2013
He   headed   for   Edinburgh   after   Christmas,   and   after   only   a   few   weeks,   in   early   1614   he   set   out   for   London   on something   of   a   mystery   mission.   One   version   is   that   he   went   to   see   King   James   himself.   He   tells   nothing   about the   purpose   of   his   journey,   but   it   so   impressed   the   king   that   he   gave   Father   Ogilvie   a   safe   conduct   to   France   in order   to   further   the   scheme.   The   King’s   constant   preoccupation   was   earning   the   loyalty of   his   Catholic   subjects.   And   he   would   dearly   have   wished   to   have   the   Pope   accept   him   as a   Protestant   King.   Perhaps   he   saw   Father   Ogilvie   as   a   vehicle   for   achieving   this.   But   the priest’s   inability   to   deliver   an   assurance   of   loyalty   had   the   effect   later   of   making   the   King more   unrelenting   towards   him.   On   the   27 th    of   March   1614   (Holy   Thursday)   Father   John arrived in Paris. From   France,   Father   Ogilvie   returned   to   Scotland   in   June,   1614,   disguised   as   horse   trader Watson,   together   with   Father   Moffat,   who   travelled   under   the   name   of   Haylburton,   to continue     his     covert     missionary     work,     mainly     around     Edinburgh,     Glasgow     and Renfrewshire.    He    was    in    Edinburgh    in    August    and    is    said    even    to    have    penetrated Edinburgh   Castle   to   comfort   prisoners.   He   then   returned   to   Glasgow   and   in   September went   to   the   house   of   Mareon   Walker   near   Stable   Green,   and   later   at   Monkland   met   Sir James Cleland. During his mission in Scotland, John Ogilvie wrote to Father Claud Aquaviva, General of the Jesuits, in July, 1614: “The   harvest   here   is   very   great;   the   labourers   here   are   very   few.   One   of   them,   Fr   Andrew   Crichton,   the   bearer   of   this (letter),   long   in   chains   for   the   faith,   is   leaving   the   country   so   as   not   to   fall   again   into   the   hands   of   the   enemy,   since   he is   (on   account   of   his   former   captivity)   too   easily   recognised,   he   would   expose   to   danger   the   noblemen   to   whom   he had often to turn, and who took him with great trepidation in their houses and hid him.” "In   my   own   country   I   am   known   to   nobody,   and   am   engaged   day   and   night   in   more   work   than   I   can   cope   with   in   any day.   I,   thanks   be   to   God,   do   whatever   I   wish   freely   during   the   day   in   the   open   streets,   and   by   night,   free   of   all suspicion, I go about the duties of my vocation...........” But   the   net   was   closing   in   on   Father   John.   He   travelled   to   Glasgow   to   reconcile   five   men   to   the   Church,   but   one was   a   spy,   Adam   Boyd,   who   had   contacted   the   Protestant   Archbishop   of   Glasgow,   John   Spottiswoode,   an appointee   of   the   King,   and   a   trap   was   set.   He   was   intercepted   by   Andrew   Hay,   a   servant   of   the   Archbishop,   and was taken to Hamilton House. On   October   14,   1614,   Father   John   was   arrested,   imprisoned   in   the   Archbishop’s   palace,   and   appeared   before the burgh court of Glasgow. His accusers had found his vestments and altar furniture. The   judges   were   Archbishop   John   Spottiswoode,   James   Hamilton,   Sir   George   Elphinstone,   Sir   Walter   Stewart, and Lords Fleming, Kilsyth and Boyd. John Ogilvie’s nightmare was about to begin…
St. John Ogilvie
Return to Homeland  - Part Two
National Shrine to St. John Ogilvie at St. Aloysius Church, Glasgow
Address: Chapel Street Keith Moray AB55 5AL SCOTLAND    Dean: Fr Colin Stewart (01343) 542280     or   (01807) 580795 Priests in residence in Huntly: Fr Kingsley Chigbo CCE (01466) 410200 Fr Peter Ezekoka e-mail: chapelstthomas@yahoo.co.uk A parish of the R.C. Diocese of Aberdeen Charitable Trust, Registered Charity Number SC 005122
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church
St Thomas' Keith adheres to the Privacy Policies as set by the RC Diocese of Aberdeen.
© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem 2013
He   headed   for   Edinburgh   after   Christmas,   and   after   only   a   few weeks,   in   early   1614   he   set   out   for   London   on   something   of   a mystery   mission.   One   version   is   that   he   went   to   see   King   James himself.   He   tells   nothing   about   the   purpose   of   his   journey,   but   it so   impressed   the   king   that   he   gave   Father   Ogilvie   a   safe   conduct to   France   in   order   to   further   the   scheme.   The   King’s   constant preoccupation   was   earning   the   loyalty   of   his   Catholic   subjects. And   he   would   dearly   have   wished   to   have   the   Pope   accept   him   as a   Protestant   King.   Perhaps   he   saw   Father   Ogilvie   as   a   vehicle   for achieving   this.   But   the   priest’s   inability   to   deliver   an   assurance   of loyalty   had   the   effect   later   of   making   the   King   more   unrelenting towards   him.   On   the   27 th    of   March   1614   (Holy   Thursday)   Father John arrived in Paris. From   France,   Father   Ogilvie   returned   to   Scotland   in   June,   1614, disguised   as   horse   trader   Watson,   together   with   Father   Moffat, who    travelled    under    the    name    of    Haylburton,    to    continue    his covert   missionary   work,   mainly   around   Edinburgh,   Glasgow   and Renfrewshire.   He   was   in   Edinburgh   in   August   and   is   said   even   to have   penetrated   Edinburgh   Castle   to   comfort   prisoners.   He   then returned    to    Glasgow    and    in    September    went    to    the    house    of Mareon   Walker   near   Stable   Green,   and   later   at   Monkland   met   Sir James Cleland. During   his   mission   in   Scotland,   John   Ogilvie   wrote   to   Father   Claud Aquaviva, General of the Jesuits, in July, 1614: “The   harvest   here   is   very   great;   the   labourers   here   are   very   few.   One of   them,   Fr   Andrew   Crichton,   the   bearer   of   this   (letter),   long   in   chains for   the   faith,   is   leaving   the   country   so   as   not   to   fall   again   into   the hands   of   the   enemy,   since   he   is   (on   account   of   his   former   captivity) too   easily   recognised,   he   would   expose   to   danger   the   noblemen   to whom   he   had   often   to   turn,   and   who   took   him   with   great   trepidation in their houses and hid him.” "In   my   own   country   I   am   known   to   nobody,   and   am   engaged   day   and night   in   more   work   than   I   can   cope   with   in   any   day.   I,   thanks   be   to God,   do   whatever   I   wish   freely   during   the   day   in   the   open   streets,   and by    night,    free    of    all    suspicion,    I    go    about    the    duties    of    my vocation...........” But   the   net   was   closing   in   on   Father   John.   He   travelled   to   Glasgow to   reconcile   five   men   to   the   Church,   but   one   was   a   spy,   Adam Boyd,   who   had   contacted   the   Protestant   Archbishop   of   Glasgow, John   Spottiswoode,   an   appointee   of   the   King,   and   a   trap   was   set. He   was   intercepted   by   Andrew   Hay,   a   servant   of   the   Archbishop, and was taken to Hamilton House. On   October   14,   1614,   Father   John   was   arrested,   imprisoned   in   the Archbishop’s    palace,    and    appeared    before    the    burgh    court    of Glasgow.     His     accusers     had     found     his     vestments     and     altar furniture. The   judges   were   Archbishop   John   Spottiswoode,   James   Hamilton, Sir   George   Elphinstone,   Sir   Walter   Stewart,   and   Lords   Fleming, Kilsyth and Boyd. John Ogilvie’s nightmare was about to begin…
National Shrine to St. John Ogilvie at St. Aloysius Church, Glasgow
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church
  St John Ogilvie
Return to Homeland           Part Two