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Accompanied   by   fellow   Jesuit   Father   James   Moffat   and   Friar   John   Campbell,   a   Capuchin,   Father   John   Ogilvie   set off    in    1613    for    Scotland    travelling    under    an    assumed    name,    of    John    Watson.    The    Government    had    spies scattered    over    the    Continent    whose    business    it    was    to    pick    up    in    Rome,    Valladolid    and    other    places, information   about   priests   and   seminarians   destined   for   home   missions.   The   information   was   forwarded   to those   who   would   search   ships   hailing   from   foreign   ports,   and   suspects   were   apprehended   on   landing   in Scotland or England. As   Watson   (the   Scottish   surname   meaning   son   of   Walter),   in   the   guise   of   a   soldier   returning   from   European wars   looking   to   turn   to   horse   dealing,   he   split   up   from   his   companions   on   landing   and   headed   for   his   native North-East,   where   the   Catholic   faith   was   still   flickering   under   the   protection   of   the   powerful   Gordon,   Earl   of Huntly.   His   superiors   may   have   felt   he   would   be   safest   here.   He   was   close   to   home   but   there   is   no   record   of him having any contact with his family. Father    John    is    thought    to    have    spent    Christmas    at    Strathbogie,    and    may    even    have    visited    Grant    of Ballindalloch,   who   was   fined   around   this   time   for   harbouring   a   priest.   Most   noblemen   wanted   little   to   do   with the   visitor.   Going   against   the   King   would   cost   them   their   position   and   land   holdings;   they   pretended   to   be faithful to the new religion to retain their wealth. However, others of professional or lower classes responded.
Return to Homeland  - Part One
St. John Ogilvie
Address: Chapel Street Keith Moray AB55 5AL SCOTLAND    Dean: Fr Colin Stewart (01343) 542280     or   (01807) 580795 Priests in residence in Huntly: Fr Kingsley Chigbo CCE (01466) 410200 Fr Peter Ezekoka e-mail: chapelstthomas@yahoo.co.uk A parish of the R.C. Diocese of Aberdeen Charitable Trust, Registered Charity Number SC 005122
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church
St Thomas' Keith adheres to the Privacy Policies as set by the RC Diocese of Aberdeen.
© Lorem ipsum dolor sit Nulla in mollit pariatur in, est ut dolor eu eiusmod lorem 2013
  St John Ogilvie
Return to Homeland          Part One
Accompanied   by   fellow   Jesuit   Father   James   Moffat   and   Friar   John Campbell,    a    Capuchin,    Father    John    Ogilvie    set    off    in    1613    for Scotland   travelling   under   an   assumed   name,   of   John   Watson.   The Government     had     spies     scattered     overthe     Continent     whose business   it   was   to   pick   up   in   Rome,   Valladolid   and   other   places, information   about   priests   and   seminarians   destined   for   home missions.   The   information   was   forwarded   to   those   who   would search    ships    hailing    from    foreign    ports,    and    suspects    were apprehended on landing in Scotland or England. As   Watson   (the   Scottish   surname   meaning   son   of   Walter),   in   the guise   of   a   soldier   returning   from   European   wars   looking   to   turn to   horse   dealing,   he   split   up   from   his   companions   on   landing   and headed   for   his   native   North-east,   where   the   Catholic   faith   was still   flickering   under   the   protection   of   the   powerful   Gordon,   Earl of   Huntly.   His   superiors   may   have   felt   he   would   be   safest   here. He   was   close   to   home   but   there   is   no   record   of   him   having   any contact with his family. Father   John   is   thought   to   have   spent   Christmas   at   Strathbogie, and   may   even   have   visited   Grant   of   Ballindalloch,   who   was   fined around   this   time   for   harbouring   a   priest.   Most   noblemen   wanted little   to   do   with   the   visitor.   Going   against   the   King   would   cost them    their    position    and    land    holdings;    they    pretended    to    be faithful    to    the    new    religion    to    retain    their    wealth.    However, others of professional or lower classes responded.
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church