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This   is   a   remarkable   story   of   a   remarkable   man   from   Keith   who   has   a   privileged   place   in   the   history   of the Roman Catholic Church, particularly in Scotland and here in the North-East. John   Ogilvie’s   life   was   short   and   yet   his   tale   of   bravery,   courage,   selflessness   and   devotion   to   his   faith has lasted long after his death almost 400 years ago. A   Jesuit   priest,   he   was   martyred   in   Glasgow   for   refusing   to   denounce   Catholicism   and   accepting   that   the King   (James   VI   of   Scotland   and   I   of   England)   had   supreme   authority   in   all   matters   spiritual   as   well   as civil.   Ogilvie   was   no   traitor   to   his   nation;   he   declared   his   loyalty   to   his   King   on   countless   occasions,   but made   clear   he   was   dying   “for   religion   alone”,   adding:   “For   that   I   am   prepared   to   give   even   a   hundred lives”. John   Ogilvie   was   not   born   a   Catholic.   He   wasn’t   admitted   to   the   faith   until   he   was   17   years   of   age.   He was a priest for only five years and he was dead by the age of 36. His   trial,   following   unspeakable   torture,   beatings,   starvation   and   sleep   deprivation,   and   his   subsequent execution,   became   a   cause   célèbre   throughout   Europe   and   he   was   revered   by   his   Jesuit   order   and throughout   the   Church.   But   it   was   not   until   1929   that   he   was   beatified   (made   Blessed)   and   1976   that   he was canonised as Scotland’s first Saint in more than 700 years. So   how   did   this   young   man   from   Keith   come   to   earn   his   place   among   the   great   and   mighty   of   the Catholic Church? 
St. John Ogilvie
Introduction

Born at Keith 1579, Executed in Glasgow 1615

The St. John Ogilvie stained glass window, St. Thomas Keith
Address: Chapel Street Keith Moray AB55 5AL SCOTLAND    Dean: Fr Colin Stewart (01343) 542280     or   (01807) 580795 Priests in residence in Huntly: Fr Kingsley Chigbo CCE (01466) 410200 Fr Peter Ezekoka e-mail: chapelstthomas@yahoo.co.uk A parish of the R.C. Diocese of Aberdeen Charitable Trust, Registered Charity Number SC 005122
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church
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St John Ogilvie
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Born at Keith 1579

 Executed in Glasgow 1615

Introduction
This   is   a   remarkable   story   of   a   remarkable   man   from   Keith who    has    a    privileged    place    in    the    history    of    the    Roman Catholic    Church,    particularly    in    Scotland    and    here    in    the North-east. John    Ogilvie’s    life    was    short    and    yet    his    tale    of    bravery, courage,   selflessness   and   devotion   to   his   faith   has   lasted   long after his death almost 400 years ago. A   Jesuit   priest,   he   was   martyred   in   Glasgow   for   refusing   to denounce   Catholicism   and   accepting   that   the   King   (James   VI   of Scotland    and    I    of    England)    had    supreme    authority    in    all matters   spiritual   as   well   as   civil.   Ogilvie   was   no   traitor   to   his nation;    he    declared    his    loyalty    to    his    King    on    countless occasions,   but   made   clear   he   was   dying   “for   religion   alone”, adding: “For that I am prepared to give even a hundred lives”. John   Ogilvie   was   not   born   a   Catholic.   He   wasn’t   admitted   to the   faith   until   he   was   17   years   of   age.   He   was   a   priest   for   only five years and he was dead by the age of 36. His   trial,   following   unspeakable   torture,   beatings,   starvation and   sleep   deprivation,   and   his   subsequent   execution,   became a   cause   célèbre   throughout   Europe   and   he   was   revered   by   his Jesuit   order   and   throughout   the   Church.   But   it   was   not   until 1929   that   he   was   beatified   (made   Blessed)   and   1976   that   he was canonised as Scotland’s first Saint in more than 700 years. So   how   did   this   young   man   from   Keith   come   to   earn   his   place among the great and mighty of the Catholic Church? 
The St. John Ogilvie stained glass window, St. Thomas Keith
St. John Ogilvie book now   available to buy for £3 at St. Thomas R.C. Church